Sleep

  • Did You Know, Lack of Sleep Can Impact Your Vision?

    Are you getting enough sleep? If not, you could be impacting the health of your eyes. At Sleep Apnea Dentists of New England, we realize that today’s fast-paced world typically results in insufficient sleep. Trying to squeeze in a good night’s rest can be difficult with everything that needs to be completed in the course of one day. Dark circles are a dead give away that you are not getting enough sleep, but your overall eye health is being affected more than you know.

    Tired Eyes from Lack of Sleep

    Vision Problems Related to Poor Sleep

    Studies have proven that the average person requires 6-8 hours of sleep per night in order to replenish. If you are getting less than six hours of sleep, your eyes do not get the restoration they need. Some of the following warning signs are indication that your eyes are not getting enough rest:

    • Eye spasms. Ever get that rapid twitching of your eye? Those involuntary spasms are called myokymia. They are involuntary eyelid muscle spasms. They are harmless, but they are a good warning sign that you should be paying more attention to getting a good night’s rest.
    • Broken blood vessels in the eye.  Though they are usually not painful, the “bloodied eye” look is definitely not very appealing.
    • Dry eye. When your eyes are unable to properly lubricate overnight, you may get dry eyes. Dry eyes cause light sensitivity, itching, redness, and sometimes even blurred vision.
    • A more serious eye condition as the result of sleep deprivation is known as Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy (AION). This is typical for middle-aged individuals who suffer from sleep apnea. Over time, damage to the optic nerve from insufficient blood supply can eventually cause vision loss.

    Better Nights for Better Vision

    Try to make a routine plan for preparing for bed at night. If falling asleep is a daunting task, here are some suggestions:

    • Drink chamomile tea approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.
    • Read a book for fifteen minutes before falling asleep.
    • Do not exercise just before going to bed. When you exercise, you raise your metabolic rate and falling asleep will be more difficult.
    • Reduce stress and decompress with essential lavender oil and positive messages to yourself.
    • A lukewarm bath with some aromatherapy candles and a good book is a great way to unwind your body and mind.

    Your eyes are not the only muscle that suffers from insufficient sleep. There are several additional health risks associated with poor sleep. Visit our website for a more extensive list of health risks associated with poor sleep.

    Meanwhile, it is important to remember that your eyes are working all day long. Sleep is the only time they have to restore and regenerate. Therefore, it is extremely important to make sure they get their rest so you may continue to enjoy healthy vision.

    Want to learn more about better nights for better days? Contact Sleep Apnea Dentists of New England today!

  • Celebrate World Sleep Day on March 13 to Advance Sleep Health Worldwide

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    World Sleep Society
    +1.507.316.0084
    info@worldsleepsociety.org
    http://worldsleepday.org/

    CELEBRATE WORLD SLEEP DAY® ON MARCH 13 TO ADVANCE SLEEP HEALTH WORLDWIDE

    ROCHESTER, MN – January 2, 2020—World Sleep Society is issuing a global call to action about the importance of healthy sleep. Friday, March 13, 2020 is the 13th annual World Sleep Day®. Created and hosted by World Sleep Society, World Sleep Day is an internationally recognized awareness event bringing researchers, health professionals and patients together to recognize sleep and its important impact on our health.

    World Sleep Day 2020 will incorporate the slogan, ‘Better Sleep, Bette Life, Better Planet,’ highlighting sleep’s important place as a pillar of health, allowing for better decision making and cognitive understanding in even big issues, such as our planet. This focus is purposefully broad in meaning, surrounding the message that quality of life can be improved with healthy sleep. Conversely, when sleep fails, health declines, decreasing quality of life. Sound sleep is a treasured function. World Sleep Society has compiled ten tips for healthier sleep. These recommendations for children and adults can be viewed on worldsleepday.org under resources.

    Dr. Liborio Parrino is Chair of the World Sleep Day Committee. Dr. Parrino expresses, “If we really want to contribute to the planet’s survival, a wise activity is to extend the period of our sleep time. That’s why this year’s World Sleep Day slogan connects good sleep to improved planet health.” Increased sleep periods mean less consumption of fuel, electricity, food and oxygen (breathing is attenuated during sleep). Better quality sleep also reduces the risk of labor-related and road accidents, promotes the secretion of melatonin and protects the natural circadian clock, which can prevent premature aging in humans. Dr. Parrino adds, “Extending our sleep period also improves our mental and body performances during the day and, last but not least, enhances our dreaming experience, as REM stages are mostly concentrated in the final portion of sleep, which is often curtailed by the urging rules of modern life.”

    Phyllis C. Zee, MD, PhD, Professor of Neurology and Director of the Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine goes on to suggest, “Actions we can take include prioritizing sleep with exercise and nutrition, maintaining regular sleep and wake timing, averaging 7-9 hours of sleep duration and if suffering from a chronic sleep disturbance, by discussing sleep with your doctor.” Over the past decade, there have been major advances in our understanding of neural mechanisms, linking the important relationship between sleep and cognitive health. Mounting evidence indicates that sleep is an active process in which recently-encoded memories are consolidated and transferred for long-term storage. Dr. Zee adds, “Sleep enhances the ability to remove waste products from the brain—which can harm brain function.”

    Professor Fang Han, MD of The Sleep Center, Peking University People’s Hospital in Beijing, China states, “Sleep is important for one’s cognitive health. Sleep can restore your brain function in many aspects, such as learning, memory, and mood.” Sleep disorders may cause impairment of a person’s oxygen supply, disturb your immunological system, or damage your brain structure. Dr. Han states, “World Sleep Day is an opportunity to be aware, sleep regularly, sleep enough, and treat sleep disorders.”

    CALL TO ACTION

    To participate in World Sleep Day, consider:

    • Organizing an event to create excitement and generate interest in World Sleep Day.
    • Circulating the official press release with sleep experts and local media.
    • Distributing sleep patient literature such as booklets, leaflets and newsletters.
    • Finding other ideas at worldsleepday.org.
    • Spreading the word on social media about #WorldSleepDay.

    More information can be viewed on worldsleepday.org/get-involved/plan.

    GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS

    The 13th Annual World Sleep Day has partnered with Arianna Huffington’s Thrive Global and AmLife. More sponsors will be included before March.

    Arianna Huffington, founder and CEO of Thrive Global says, “Sleep is central to every aspect of our well-being—our physical health, our mental health, our productivity and our decision-making. Our world is facing huge crises on multiple fronts, and we need all the resilience, wisdom and sound decision-making we can muster. We can’t take care of our world if we don’t take care of ourselves—and that begins with sleep.”

    Mr. Lew Mun Yee, the founder of AmLife states, “AmLife is fully devoted in the noble mission of World Sleep Society in advocating better-quality sleep in mankind. AmLife proudly joins the call for Better Sleep, Better Life, Better Planet, this year’s World Sleep Day theme. AmLife’s new tagline—Life. Redefined.—dovetails the 2020 theme. With better quality of sleep, life certainly can be redefined.”

    CONTACTS

    Allan O’Bryan, World Sleep Society Executive Director: obryan@worldsleepsociety.org
    Dr. Liborio Parrino, 2020 World Sleep Day Committee Chair: liborio.parrino@unipr.it

    ###

    About World Sleep Society

    World Sleep Day is organized by World Sleep Society, an international association whose mission is to advance sleep health worldwide. WorldSleep Society hosts a biennial scientific congress on sleep medicine aiming to globally connect sleep professionals and researchers to advance current knowledge on sleep. A job board has also been created for sleep medicine professionals on http://www.worldsleepsociety.org. Follow the excitement on Twitter @_WorldSleep and facebook.com/WASMF.

    About AmLife International

    AmLife established its sleep healthcare business to help consumers achieve optimal health in their daily sleep as well as enjoy the wonderful health lifting and recuperative effects of its products. AmLife has pioneered the combination of bedding equipment and Japan’s state-of-the-art technology to expand the unlimited potential of the sleep healthcare market, providing a brand-new health solution for modern-day people, which they can use every day.

  • Short Sleep May Harm Bone Health

    Written by Catharine Paddock, Ph.D. on November 20, 2019 – Fact checked by Jasmin Collier

    Can insufficient sleep be harmful to bone health? New research in postmenopausal women has found that those who slept for no longer than 5 hours per night were most likely to have lower bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis.

    A team from the University at Buffalo, NY, led the study of 11,084 postmenopausal women, all of whom were participants in the Women’s Health Initiative.

    A recent paper in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research gives a full account of the findings.

    The investigation follows an earlier one in which the team had linked short sleep to a higher likelihood of bone fracture in women.

    Our study suggests that sleep may negatively impact bone health, adding to the list of the negative health impacts of poor sleep. I hope that it can also serve as a reminder to strive for the recommended 7 or more hours of sleep per night for our physical and mental health.

    Heather M. Ochs-Balcom, Ph.D. Lead Study Coordinator

    Bone remodeling and osteoporosis

    Bone is living tissue that undergoes continuous formation and resorption. The process, known as bone remodeling, removes old bone tissue and replaces it with new bone tissue.

    If you are sleeping less, one possible explanation is that bone remodeling isn’t happening properly.

    Ochs-Balcom

    The term osteoporosis means porous bone and refers to a condition that develops when the quality and density of bone are greatly reduced. Osteoporosis is more common in older adults, with older women having the highest risk of developing it.

    In most people, bone strength and density peak when they are in their late 20s. After that, as they continue to age, the rate of bone resorption gradually overtakes that of formation. The bone density of women reduces more rapidly during the first few years after menopause.

    Worldwide, around 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men in their 50s and older are at risk of experiencing bone fracture due to osteoporosis, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation.

    The most common sites of fracture in people with osteoporosis are the hips, wrists, and spine.

    Spinal fractures can be serious, resulting in severe back pain, structural irregularities, and loss of height. Hip fractures are also of concern, as they often require surgery and can lead to loss of independence. They also carry a raised risk of death.


    Get your FREE guide today.